Teen Birth Control Without Consent

Our daughters and birth control mean more than just pregnancy prevention to moms. Most times it is facing the reality our daughters are sexually active or considering having sex. Either way, it is a critical time in the mother-daughter relationship, or any parenting relationship. Parents want to protect the mental, physical, and emotional health of their child and ensure all the information, relevant to the values of that household, are being reinforced. That duty should not be taken away by the school board, state, or special interest groups.

Birth control is not something any parent wants to leave as the sole choice of their minor child. They are just starting to live and while most teenagers believe they know enough, we adults and parents, looking back on the arrogance of our adolescence, realize they don’t know jack. A school nurse or Planned Parenthood counselor are not much more qualified to know if a random child should be given birth control without the consent or knowledge of that child’s parent. Yet, this is a very common practice throughout the nation. Recently a 6th grader was implanted with an IUD without their parent’s consent. While living in New York, I remember learning minors can get the “morning after pill” and even utilize abortion services without the consent of parents. Yes, you may never know if your daughter was sexually active, exposing herself to disease, pregnant, or worse. What if your daughter were too ashamed to admit she was involved in an abusive relationship or sexually assaulted resulting in the possibility of pregnancy so she “took care of it” herself.

This is why education, political involvement, and, most importantly, open and honest communication with our children is important. Communication involves listening to their thoughts and concerns as well as giving information about our expectations as parents. If the lines of communication are not open, they may believe an impartial counselor or nurse would have the answer for their situation. Remain a loving, receptive, and active mom in your daughter’s life because their life depends on it.

Check your current state legislation to see if there have been changes or additions to any policy.

STATECONDITIONS FOR OBTAINING CONTRACEPTIVE SERVICES
AlabamaMinors over 14 years, who have completed HS, who are married, or who have a child may get any health care services.
AlaskaAll minors with no restrictions.
ArizonaAll minors with no restrictions.
ArkansasAll minors with no restrictions.
CaliforniaAll minors with no restrictions.
ColoradoAll minors with no restrictions.
ConnecticutMinors who are married.
DelawareFor minors who are 12 and over, the physician may, but is not required to, inform the parents.
District of ColumbiaAll minors with no restrictions.
FloridaMinors who require contraceptives for health reasons, who are married, have a child, are pregnant, or who have ever been pregnant.
GeorgiaAll minors with no restrictions.
HawaiiFor minors 14 and over, the physician may, but is not required to, inform the parents.
IdahoAll minors with no restrictions.
IllinoisMinors who require contraceptives for health reasons, who are married, have a child, are pregnant, who have ever been pregnant, or who have a refrral.
IndianaMinors who are married.
IowaAll minors with no restrictions.
KansasMinors who are mature.
KentuckyAll minors with no restrictions. However, the physician may, but is not required to, inform the parents.
LouisianaMinors who are married.
MaineMinors who require contraceptives for health reasons, who are married, or have a child.
MarylandAll minors with no restrictions. However, the physician may, but is not required to, inform the parents.
MassachusettsAll minors with no restrictions.
MichiganMinors who are married.
MinnesotaAll minors with no restrictions. However, the physician may, but is not required to, inform the parents.
MississippiMinors who are married, have a child, or who have a referral.
MissouriMinors who are married.
MontanaAll minors with no restrictions. However, the physician may, but is not required to, inform the parents.
NebraskaMinors who are married.
NevadaMinors who are married. Minors who have a child or who are mature may get any health care services.
New HampshireMinors who are mature.
New JerseyMinors who are are married, pregnant, or who have ever been pregnant may get any health care services.
New MexicoAll minors with no restrictions.
New YorkAll minors with no restrictions.
North CarolinaAll minors with no restrictions.
North DakotaNo explicit policy.
OhioNo explicit policy.
OklahomaMinors who are are married, pregnant, or who have ever been pregnant.
OregonAll minors with no restrictions. However, the physician may, but is not required to, inform the parents.
PennsylvaniaMinors who are are married, pregnant, have ever been pregnant, or graduated HS may get any health care services.
Rhode IslandNo explicit policy.
South CarolinaMinors who are married, 16 or over, or who are mature.
South DakotaMinors who are married.
TennesseeAll minors with no restrictions.
TexasMinors who are married. State funds may not be used.
UtahMinors who are married. State funds may not be used.
VermontMinors who are married.
VirginiaAll minors with no restrictions.
WashingtonAll minors with no restrictions.
West VirginiaMinors who are married.
WisconsinNo explicit policy.
WyomingAll minors with no restrictions.

Source: “Minors Access to Contraceptive Services,” State Policies in Brief, AGI, Dec 1, 2005.

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